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All the latest RapidWeaver Stacks reviewed,
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Perfect Warehousing With RapidWeaver

Warehoused content keeps your RapidWeaver projects compact and reduces page loading times. We've all heard that, but uploading sites using the RW publishing controls doesn't allow us to freely access the resources folder and not everyone is comfortable using FTP software.
A perfect solution would be a secure file manager that allows you to upload your files via a browser and then to link to said files in RW.

Using Jannis of InStacks' own words Repository is the perfect solution! Judge for yourself.

Setting up Repository is a breeze. Drag the new stack into a Stacks page (it needs to reside on its own page), set a user name and password and publish.
Open up your repository directory in the browser and drag files into it, or download the files that it contains. There's nothing else to it.
Or is there?

First step – setting the user and password – Repository doesn't save passwords as plaintext, but uses a hash code which you'll first need to generate. That's simple enough – got to the Repository instruction page, scroll down to Generating your own password hash, click the link and enter the password you'd like to use. Click 'Generate Hash' and copy the result into the Password Hash field in the stack settings. Only a single user is allowed.
As a further safety precaution, Repository also has a Blacklist and a Whitelist. Lists of file extension that may, or may not be uploaded. This means that potentially harmful files will never land on your server. I tried to upload an .exe file and received an error message. Something tells me that someone is taking security very seriously here.

InStacks Repository

There is, of course, more to the setup than just entering the password hash. If you want your clients to be able to access the folder, there are a few options available in the Repository stack settings that will help improve security.

"But why would you want your clients to be able to access the repository?" I hear you ask.
Because if your images are warehoused and your client has access to them, he/she can replace them at will. And, if you've added text blocks to your project using a stack such as Embed from S4S, he/she could change the text content too!

Repository currently offers two flavours. Bootstrap, or Material Design. Both look quite attractive when loaded in your browser (you don't see a lot in edit, or preview mode), but more importantly, the user interface is functional. The menu at the top of the page includes Refresh; Search; Upload; New Document; New Folder and Logout.
It's not immediately obvious, but you can just drag files into the browser window to upload them to the server.

Text files can be edited directly by clicking the Edit button, but the most distinctive feature is a built in lightbox for images.

Stack Settings

Theme - Bootstrap Design, Material Design
Nav Back Colour
Nav Text Colour
Check Authentication - can be deactivated
Username
Password Hash
Language
Timezone
Open Files In New Window

Then follow a flurry of additional options to allow, or disallow: File Download, Copy To Clipboard, Copy/Move Files/Directories, Create Directories, Create Files, Edit Files, Delete Files/Directories, Extract Archives, Upload, Rename, Create Archives.
Show: Last Modified Date, File Size, Image Dimensions, Owner, Group Htdocs, Hidden Files.

If you need a secure File Manager, Media Browser, and Online Text Editor for RapidWeaver, Repository is most certainly a very good choice.

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Just In Time – Advanced Publishing for RapidWeaver

Back in February, 2015, I compared five sets of stacks that allowed time-based publishing with RapidWeaver. One of the best of those stacks was Advanced Publisher from Tsooj Media. Advanced Publisher is now even better than before. It has been rewritten and improved by Will Woodgate and has been housed within the S4S stables.

You've prepared an article that you don't wish to appear until August 25th, or you have a special promotion that is only available between September and November and only during business hours. Or maybe you have student's examination results, or study material that should only be available to a specific student, or group of students…

Advanced Publisher from Stacks4Stacks is a suite of five PHP based stacks which will allow you to publish time sensitive content at specific times, or when a URL query is fulfilled.
Because AP is PHP based your content will never be loaded unnecessarily. It will never appear within your code until it is requested. This means that advanced users and hackers can not view your unpublished content until the defined time range has been reached, or the specific URL query has been requested.
The inclusion of the AP Secret stack gives you the option of supplying unique content to unique visitors. You can also create your own tabbed content using AP Secret, to ensure that your pages load faster.

Advanced Publisher

Stack settings

A single Advanced Publisher Base stack must be present on the page containing your AP content, preferably above the other AP stacks. The AP Base stack allows you to set the time zone that your scheduled data will appear in. The time zone can be set to 'Webserver', 'Predefined' or 'Custom'. Predefined gives you a choice of locations from each time zone around the world – including the half and quarter hour steps of some locations. If you choose custom, you can enter the zone manually, e.g. Asia/Kathmandu.

The AP Base Stack can refresh the pages content every n minutes and also has options to display or hide the preview in RapidWeaver and to display the publishing details so that there will be no surprises if you'd forgotten that a previous promotion, or article was on your page. It's interesting to note that the publishing details also include the server's PHP version.

The AP Days Stack is for stacks that you wish to be displayed on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; Mondays to Fridays, or Fridays to Mondays, for instance. The settings panel contains checkboxes for the days of the week that content is to be published on.

AP Days also has a choice of settings to publish content on Even Days, Odd Days, the First Day of the Month, Last Day of the Month, Month Days (with settings for up to four separate days), Particular Month Days (with settings for the range of days) and, as with all of the Advanced Publisher Content stacks, an option to display alternative content outside of the publishing dates.

The AP Time Stack supplies the options for your publishing timeframe. This can be set to
Full Date. Full Date can be set to Display: Not Until (Start Date), Between and Only Before, With a Date and Time Range for each of those settings.
Repeatable Date has the same settings.
Hours and Minutes also has the above settings, but is restricted to a Time Range
Months also shares the above settings, but is restricted to months.

The AP Weeks Stack will allow you to publish content during different weeks. You may choose Odd Weeks, Even Weeks, Week(s) with options for up to four different weeks, Weeks (Not Until), Weeks (Between) and Weeks (Not Before).

The AP Secret Stack will allow you to publish stacks that are only accessible when a URL query is fulfilled. This means that you may either add a specific link to your page to display your hidden content, or you could give your user a page link to access specific content within your page.
The stack settings allow you to define a Secret Key and a Secret Value. Only when both are contained within the URL e.g. ["?secret_key=secret_value"], will your content be revealed.

Note: AP stacks can be nested to further refine your publishing dates. Hence, if you wish your content to appear during weeks 32 and 33, but only between the hours of 9–5, you can carefully nest your AP stacks to fulfil this wish.

Advanced Publisher 4 has been greatly improved over the previous version. Everything that was missing in version 3 has now been added. As Will himself says: It's like having a personal assistant for your website!

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Did You Ever Wonder What Your RapidWeaver Project Looks Like On A Nexus?

… or a Google Pixel, a Galaxy S7, or just wanted to check the display on your iPhone 7 without actually uploading the project?
Blisk to the rescue!
There have been a couple of dual pane browsers before, but none of them were really reliable. They would display a rendering of your website at a specific width, but wouldn't actually attempt to emulate your device. Blisk Does.

I've been using Blisk for some time now and find it to be quite reliable at showing me what my website will look like on various devices. Not 100%, of course, but my impression is 95% of the time.

I currently use a Galaxy S4. Not by choice, but I slipped and fell on my premium mobile, rendering it all but useless. I've used Blisk numerous times to simulate a site's rendering on a Galaxy S4 and have found it reliable enough to make alterations before uploading. The S4 is a fickle device and if Blisk can render a project reliably for the S4, then I'm pretty certain that the other renderings are also reliable.

You'll find that there are two 'versions' of Blisk: a standard and a premium version. The standard version works for a couple of hours and then asks you to return later for your next session. As I seldom use Blisk more often than twice a day, I find this o.k. The premium version is quite pricy at $9.99/month, or $101.88/year, but, if you use it on a regular basis, possibly worth the money.

So what is Blisk exactly? Blisk is a freemium, Chromium-based web browser that aims to improve productivity and code quality by providing a wide array of tools for Web development and testing for different type of devices: desktop, tablet and mobile. Blisk comes with a seemingly endless pre-installed set of phones and tablets in emulated mode that makes it easy for developers to test how their code renders across multiple devices and browsers. The feature is used to compare how design responds to different screen resolutions and pixel ratios. Emulation functionality enables testing page behavior in various environments without having to rely on actual devices, but emulating them directly on a PC or Mac.
As the current machine that I use for website development is a MacBook Pro, I often wondered what my sites looked like on a large screen. Now I know that they can look quite terrible!

Blisk

Blisk has a number of useful features – it can take screenshots and make videos, which are stored online, it displays errors during page load, has a page inspector and can rotate the device being emulated. Scroll sync is activated by default, so your current position on the page is always mirrored in both portions of the screen.

I suggest that, if you haven't already tried it, you give Blisk shot. If you decide to use it multiple times a day, then the time limit will be annoying, but a quick glance (directly from RW, of course; Blisk appears as one of the browsers for the preview) at how your page looks on the Galaxy Edge, is always useful.

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CodeBox – an Indispensable Tool For Weavers (And Other Coders)

Years ago, when I found a useful snippet of code, I would copy it, insert it directly into RapidWeaver and rejoice at the results (if it worked). When it came to re-using the snippets, it was case of first remembering the project that I used them in and then trying to isolate them from other snippets that I'd added to said project. Thanks to CodeBox that is no longer the case.

I find CodeBox to be an indispensable tool for my RapidWeaver endeavours. Usually, when you find an HTML snippet, or a CSS snippet they are interconnected, often with a snippet of JavaScript. CodeBox makes it simple to archive the snippets in a way that they can be easily discovered and used over and over again. Just copy the snippets to CodeBox, make sure that they have the same (or similar) name, add the extension HTML, CSS, JS, or even TXT and you can be sure to find the relevant pieces of code again.

The advantage of having a related name is, of course, the search function available in CodeBox. If my related snippets all have the content "curtains" then, if I search CodeBox for "curtains" I will immediately see the CSS, HTML and JavaScripts that are related to the snippet that I added years ago.

CodeBox
You'll notice that with so many of my posts, if you hover over the image above, it will change from the HTML list to the CSS list of CodeBox. If you think that I might be able to remember the code to swap an image when you hover over it, you're mistaken, I'm not a code junkie, I have an acute case of code-phobia! But CodeBox comes to my aid on a daily basis.


Something that is especially useful, is the fact that CodeBox syncs with the cloud!
Recently my hard drive crashed and – not having an adequate backup system in place – I lost a lot of information. Because CodeBox was set to sync with my Dropbox account, however, as soon as I reinstalled the app all of my snippets were immediately available again – The necessary CSS is still in place on my server, so I can still add rollovers or this link enhancement to my blog posts without having to search online for the code again!

CodeBox has a multitude of formatting options, so no matter if your code snippets are destined for Ruby On Rails, or are simply text snippets, they will aways be formatted correctly. And once you've discovered the snippet that you're looking for, just click the 'tick' box beneath the snippet and it is copied to the clipboard for use in the next application.

If you are constantly forgetting which HTML is related to which CSS, or JS snippet, then I can highly recommend CodeBox. It doesn't cost the earth an it is extremely useful.
Oh, and the social icons below — they were also added via CodeBox and I also use CodeBox to store standard replies to various forums that I'm active on ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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